Outdoor Boot Camp for Women is "Better than a Run or a Bike Ride"

Posted by Angie Quehl on Mar 21, 2011 8:12:00 AM

Spring has arrived and so has the resurgence of fitness boot camps. By now many of you may have heard of boot camps through friends or advertisements but to for those of you who may be new to the scene a definition may be in order....

What is Boot Camp?

A fitness boot camp is type of outdoor group exercise class that mixes traditional calisthenic and body weight exercises with interval training and strength training. While there are a variety of styles of fitness boot camps, most are designed in a way that pushes the participants harder than they'd push themselves.

These fitness classes have grown in popularity over the years primarily because they offer a new way to get a low-cost, efficient and challenging workout. With the right instructor, these fitness classes get fast results and create a supportive and motivational community of like-minded people.

But what do you really get out of a boot camp workout?

The American Council on Exercise studied boot camps, including the ones at health clubs. Their bottom line: Outdoor boot camp for women is an excellent way to enhance aerobic capacity and help control body weight. One researcher called it "more of a total-body workout than just going out for a run or bicycle ride."

Read more about Outdoor Boot Camp at the Women's Club...

 

outdoor bootcamp for women only

 

Portions of this content originally appeared on About.com

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Topics: group exercise classes for women, gym chantilly, group fitness classes, fitness for women, exercise programs for women, bootcamp exercise classes, the women's club

The Resolution Solution, Final Chapter - How to Get & Stay Motivated!

Posted by Angie Quehl on Mar 9, 2011 5:01:00 PM

Motivate ME!

As a personal trainer and motivator, it’s a great feeling to solve the puzzle for an individual and get them on the right track to a fitter and more complete person.  The motivator will be different for each person; some will thrive on competition with peers while others may need a consequence or reward to maintain their focus. But no matter what, an individual’s motivation is as unique as their personality. Dangling the proverbial carrot in front of someone only works if they’re hungry! Finding the motivation to keep your fitness routine going can be a real challenge...but the benefits far out way the work!

We all need to get to the root of what drives our specific behaviors. For some monetary and material rewards work, for others working towards an event like a wedding or beach trip is the answer.  But these types of motivation are rarely beneficial in the long term.  Somewhere deep within ourselves we must find some type of unique behavior trigger that will inspire us for the long haul.  I love to show each of my personal training clients how the hard work they put into today directly moves them towards the goals they have set for their life. And perhaps the weight is slowly coming off or their endurance is slowing improving, but it is moving forward and that is the goal.   

Another way to search for common motivators is by taking a look at Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs, yeah, think back to college Psych 101. This is a motivation model developed in 1943 whose premise is that we all have a common hierarchy of needs from hunger to self-esteem. If we aren’t satisfying the lower-level needs (hunger, thirst, bodily needs), then we’ll never be able to reach our goals at the next level (self-esteem / self-awareness). Using this model in our fitness motivation puzzle, you can see where materialistic rewards are good for short-term goals only. But sooner or later, your fitness motivation goals will need to be based on a solid foundation of self-improvement and that vision you have of a better you far into the future. A reunion or vacation may motivate us to lose 10 pounds in a month, but what will sustain our good habits to help us walk around the block when we’re in our 80s? Answering questions like these will help you find the keys to unlock the secret to your personal motivation.

Motivation thorugh personal training chantilly

What is it that you ultimately want

...a finisher’s medal from a marathon may get you that foundation of confidence and self-respect that you’re looking for …or involvement in a health club may be help you fill a social void in your life. No matter what path you take to better health and fitness, you’ll increase the quality and quantity of your life – but you’ve got to want it to get it. Find out what will spark your fitness motivation energy and get out there and try it!

Article Submitted by:

Meredith Chiapello Personal Trainers Northern Virginia resized 600Meredith Chiapello, Director of Personal Training and Group Exercise, The Women's Club 

 

question markHave questions for Meredith? Click the link below or submit them in them Comments Section below! 

Ask a Question about fitness for women

 

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Topics: women's health, gym chantilly, Women's Wellness, health tips, exercise programs for women, personal training for women, the women's club

The Resolution Solution Part VI: Strength Training for Women

Posted by Angie Quehl on Feb 19, 2011 2:39:00 PM

Strength Training for Women

Strength training refers to exercise that requires your muscles to exert a force against some form of resistance. The increase in muscle strength and endurance allows a person to perform everyday tasks with less effort and for longer periods of time. Simply forcing the muscles to work on a regular basis significantly improves their capacity to do work and will improve circulation, coordination, balance, bone and ligament strength.

Use it or lose it

Muscle mass naturally diminishes with age. "If you don't do anything to replace the lean muscle you lose, you'll increase the percentage of fat in your body," says Edward Laskowski, M.D., a physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., and co-director of the Mayo Clinic Sports Medicine Center. "But strength training can help you preserve and enhance your muscle mass — at any age."

Strength training also helps you:

  • Develop strong bones. By stressing your bones, strength training increases bone density and reduces the risk of osteoporosis.
  • Control your weight. As you gain muscle, your body gains a bigger "engine" to burn calories more efficiently — which can result in weight loss. The more toned your muscles, the easier it is to control your weight.
  • Reduce your risk of injury. Building muscle helps protect your joints from injury. It also contributes to better balance, which can help you maintain independence as you age.
  • Boost your stamina. As you get stronger, you won't fatigue as easily.
  • Manage chronic conditions. Strength training can reduce the signs and symptoms of many chronic conditions, including arthritis, back pain, depression, diabetes, obesity and osteoporosis.
  • Sharpen your focus. Some research suggests that regular strength training helps improve attention for older adults.

Strength training for women the women's club

Consider the options

Strength training can be performed in a few different ways:

  • Body weight. You can do many exercises with little or no equipment. Try push-ups, pull-ups, abdominal crunches and leg squats.
  • Resistance tubing. Resistance tubing provides resistance when stretched.
  • Free weights. Barbells and dumbbells are classic strength training tools.
  • Weight machines. Here is a great way to work each individual muscle group in the least amount of time.

Strength training needs to be performed 2 – 3 times a week and it is best to give your muscles a day in between to rest and recover. When you can easily do more than 15 repetitions of a certain exercise, gradually increase the weight or resistance. Remember to stop if you feel pain. Although mild muscle soreness is normal, sharp pain and sore or swollen joints are signs that you've overdone it.

Article Submitted by:

Meredith Chiapello Personal Trainers Northern Virginia resized 600Meredith Chiapello, Director of Personal Training and Group Exercise, The Women's Club 

 

 

question markHave questions for Meredith? Thoughts you would like to share? Tips that you believe may be helpful for other Readers? Click the link or submit them in them Comments Section below! 

Ask a Question about fitness for women

 

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Topics: gym chantilly, personal training, exercise programs for women, personal training for women, Strength training for women, the women's club, woman's club

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