6 Gross Things Found in Your Food: Nutrition Advice for Women

Posted by Angie Quehl on Jun 18, 2012 4:00:00 PM

Nasty Things in Everyday Food

When pink slime oozed into public consciousness, we all scrunched our noses. What was this mystery substance—a food additive made of beef trimmings that are heated, compressed into blocks, and then exposed to bacteria-killing ammonia—hiding in processed meat? It also got us thinking about what other shocking ingredients go undercover in our grub. In the edition of Nutrition Advice for Women, we take look at what Prevention Magazine's research revealed including some surprising secrets that rival—and possibly even beat—pink slime.

1. Prozac In Your Poultry pexels-photo-286580

Bad news for those of you who swear by the curative powers of chicken-noodle soup:the chicken may be sicker than you are. Researchers from Johns Hopkins University tested bird feathers and found a laundry list of feed additives, including banned antibiotics, antidepressants, allergy medications, arsenic,            the active ingredient in Benadryl, caffeine, and other prescription and over-the-counter drugs.


How to avoid it: If you’re looking to plate a less-medicated piece of poultry, go organic instead. Organic regulations forbid the routine use of antibiotics (and all of those other drugs mentioned above) in chicken feed.

Photo by Achim Bongard from Pexels

2. Sheep Oil In Your Gum

Not to burst your bubble, but there might be something rather unsavory in your chewing gum. It’s called lanolin, a term for the oil sheep produce in their wool. These greasy secretions are used as softeners in foods and masked with the vague food label “gum base.” Lanolin is also used as an emollient in beauty products, from skin and hair care to cosmetics.
How to avoid it: Luckily, there are vegan versions of all of these products. If you’re concerned about eating lanolin, go for those, instead.

cereal-932193_640

 

3. Wood Pulp In Your Cereal

Wood pulp brings “plant-based diet” to a whole new level. Cellulose is usually made from nontoxic wood pulp or cotton, and the cheap filler is stuffed into shredded cheese, salad dressing, and ice cream to thicken it without adding calories or fat. Cellulose is fibrous, which is why it appears in so many high-fiber “healthy” snacks and breakfast cereals—and it’s even in organic products, according to an investigation by The Wall Street Journal.
How to avoid it: Checking your food labels is crucial and steer clear of terms like microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), cellulose gel, and cellulose gum, and carboxymethyl cellulose.

4. Cow Enzymes In Your Cheese

Cheese is often the last holdout for vegetarians: a decadent way to indulge without eating meat and a primary source of protein. Unfortunately, some cheese is anything but suitable for a meat-free diet. That’s because a lot of cheese is made with rennet , whichamanda-kerr-226442-unsplash contains an enzyme extracted from the fourth stomach of newborn calves. Rennet is used as a cheese curdler, sometimes in tandem with another enzyme called pepsin, which is extracted from stomach glands of hogs.
How to avoid it: Fortunately, some companies are using alternatives that result in truly vegetarian cheese. Check food labels, and be wary of ingredients listed merely as “enzymes.”

Photo by Amanda Kerr on Unsplash

5. Duck Feathers In Your Dough

We were as shocked as you will be to learn that duck feathers are often packed into our favorite processed breads in the form of L-cysteine, an agent used as a dough softener. It’s in bagels, cookie dough, bread, pies and more. While there are other sources of this filler available, a 2007 investigation by the nonprofit Vegetarian Resource Group found that about 80% of L-cysteine was derived from our feathered friend.
How to avoid it: It might not be on ingredient labels, so you’ll have to check with the manufacturer to find out if they use L-cysteine. You can also avoid L-cysteine by eating products that are Kosher or gluten-free, or by baking your own bread.

6. Fish Bladders In Your Beer

Here’s some news that will drain the “happy” out of your happy hour: Widely used in the beer-brewing process is a form of collagen called isinglass, which is made from the swim bladders of fish. Isinglass clumps with the beer’s yeast and sinks to the bottom, allowing for a much clearer brew.
How to avoid it: Because isinglass combines with the dregs of the barrel, it usually can’t be detected in the final product. But if you’re still queasy at the thought, grab a case of vegan beer instead.

pexels-photo-1128975

 Photo by rawpixel.com from Pexels

Check Out Some Other Food Pitfalls to Avoid:

 

 

 

 

Source: Prevention Magazine, 7 Gross Things in Your Food

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Topics: nutrition advice for women, healthy eating for women, nutritional coaching for women

5 SHOCKING "Health Food" Phonies...more Nutrition Advice for Women

Posted by Angie Quehl on Oct 17, 2011 12:37:00 PM

If your weight-loss regimen consists of giving up the foods you love in favor of a diet of strictly flaxseeds and rice cakes, it's time to reconsider your strategy. There are lots foods out there masquerading as being "healthy" when in reality although they may be better than some other choices, their true nutritional value may not be quite as it seems.

Seemingly nutritious packaged and prepared foods often abound with added sugars, preservatives, and dangerous, belt-breaking fats. To help you sort out some of the biggest culprits we have have identified the most punishing health ruses and replaced them with delicious alternatives that will keep you satisfied and give you all the purported nutritional benefits that many of our most beloved foods sadly do not. 

1. Turkey Burger

850 calories 
50 g fat 


Eat this instead!11741229116_999770c8c9_b
7-oz sirloin steak
350 calories 
20 g fat 


People hear turkey and automatically think lean and healthy, but depending on the type of ground turkey and toppings used, one of these poultry patties can be every bit as fatty and caloric as a beef burger. Sirloin, on the other hand, is one of the leanest cuts of meat available, which makes for an incredibly satisfying, protein-enriched meal that will keep you feeling fuller, longer.

Who wouldn't want to make this swap?   

 

2. Bran Muffin

420 calories 
20 g fat


Eat this instead!

Ham, egg and cheese on an English muffin
300 calories 
12 g fat 


Bran muffins are comprised of two things your body doesn't want in the morning: sugar and refined flour. Both will work to spike your blood sugar, which signals your body to start storing fat and sets you up for a mid-morning crash. And with only trace amounts of fiber, there's nothing healthy about this misunderstood muffin. The breakfast sandwich, on the other hand, is a surprisingly great way to start your day. Besides having fewer calories, fat, and carbs, it also offers about 20 grams of protein, which we really need in the morning to jumpstart our metabolism.    

3. Yogurt with Fruit on the Bottom

Fruit on Bottom Yogurt190 calories 
30 g sugars 

Eat this instead!
Plain yogurt with fresh fruit mixed in
110 calories 
15 g sugars 


You wouldn't start your morning with a can of Coke, would you? Then you should pass on these troublesome yogurt cups since they contain as much sugar as a soft drink. Almost all of what comes directly from the "fruit" is high-fructose corn syrup. Yogurt and fruit can be a great way to start your day, but do it yourself by mixing a cup of nonfat plain yogurt with a half cup of mixed berries.    

4. Margarine

100 calories 
11 g fat

2.5 g saturated


Eat this instead!


Whipped Butter (1 tbsp)
50 calories 
6 g fat 

1.5 g saturated

In their haste to remove saturated fat from butter, margarine makers created a monster—a soft, spreadable sludge loaded with trans-fats, a dangerous lipid with more concerning links to heart disease than saturated fat. Stick with the real stuff, but pick up whipped butter from brands like Land O' Lakes instead; by whipping air into the butter, manufacturers decrease the caloric density of a tablespoon of butter, plus it makes for easier spreading.  

  

5. Dried Fruit             

175 calories 
45 g sugars

dried-fruits-3474

Eat this instead!
Fresh fruit like a apple or a peach
70 calories 
15 g sugars 

Okay, so dried fruit won't totally derail a day of good eating but it's far from being a harmless snack. First, because the dehydrating process sucks most of the volume from the fruit, you can eat cups of the stuff, and 600 calories later, still not feel any fuller. More troubling, though, is the fact that companies almost invariably add a ton of sugar to the fruit, making Craisins closer to candy than Mother Nature's original intention. In this case, the choice is clear: Stick to the real stuff.

Our best advice...read the labels and not just all of the numbers. "The quality of our food is profoundly important," says Rita of FitBlogger.com.  Take the time to check out what might be lurking in that so-called "heath food". In addition to the calories, sugar, fat and sodium there can be all sorts of other things that are added to make some of these foods taste better but might even be harmful to you. Like everything else under the sun, there's even "an app for that" ! Fooducate’s free iPhone app scans UPC codes to assess products with an algorithm that favors real ingredients, actual (vs. fortified) nutrients and minimal processing.

Need Help?

At The Women's Club we have all sorts of experts that would love to help you with your weight loss and nutrition questions. Shoot us an email to womensclub@aol.com, leave us your question in the comment section, or to submit your question anonymously click 'Ask Us' below.

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List compiled from an article on Eat This, Not That.com
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Topics: nutrition advice for women, weight loss for women, nutrition, nutritional coaching for women

Nutrition Advice for Women: 3 Bathing Suit-Friendly Burgers

Posted by Angie Quehl on May 25, 2011 11:42:00 AM

Fire Up the Grill!

Memorial Day symbolizes the unofficial start to summer as well the start of the barbecue season. Along with the weekend's festivities comes all of the food which can often (although tasty) mean a ton of fat and calories added to your diet. News flash...great grilling does not have to turn into extra pounds on to a frame you have been working so hard to get summer-ready. To help you not sabotage your efforts we offer you some great alternatives to an American BBQ standard, the burger. Delicious AND nutritious these babies will not only make your barbecue a hit and satisfy your guests, but will also help you strut that bathing suit body all season long!

Turkey Gorgonzola Burgers                 nutrition tips for women turkey burger

 1 lb lean ground turkey
3 oz Gorgonzola cheese, chopped
1/2 cup sun-dried tomatoes, drained and chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tsp cumin powder
2 tsp vegetable oil
6 100% whole-grain buns
6 Tbsp barbecue sauce
Shredded cabbage (optional)

1. Preheat grill to medium. Combine first five ingredients and salt and pepper to taste in a bowl. Lightly mix together and form into 6 patties. Brush them with oil.

2. Grill burgers for 4 to 5 minutes per side or until internal temp is 165°F. Toast buns for 2 minutes. Serve burgers on buns; garnish with barbecue sauce and cabbage, if desired.

Makes 6 servings . Per serving: 293 cal, 11 g fat (4 g sat), 27 g carbs, 4 g fiber, 545 mg sodium, 26 g protein

 

Garden Chicken Burger with Strawberry SauceNutrition Tips for women chicken burger

3 tsp vegetable oil
1/2 medium onion, finely chopped
2 Tbsp brown sugar
2 cups strawberries, sliced
1/2 Tbsp balsamic vinegar
1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1 Tbsp fresh mint, chopped
1 medium carrot, peeled
1 medium zucchini, peeled
1 lb lean ground chicken breast
1/2 cup bread crumbs
2 tsp Worcestershire sauce
1 egg, lightly beaten
1/3 cup parsley, chopped
6 flatbreads or naan
1 cup arugula or baby spinach

1. Warm 1 teaspoon vegetable oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add onion and saute until soft, about 4 minutes. Add brown sugar and continue cooking for 2 minutes. Add strawberries, balsamic vinegar, and black pepper; cook for 1 minute. Stir in mint and remove from heat.

2. Preheat grill to medium. Using a box grater or mandoline, shred carrot and zucchini, then chop into small pieces. In a large bowl, lightly mix shredded vegetables, ground chicken, bread crumbs, Worcestershire sauce, egg, parsley, and salt and pepper to taste. Form into 6 patties and brush with remaining vegetable oil.

3. Place burgers on grill and cook for 4 to 5 minutes per side or until internal temperature reaches 165°F. Meanwhile, toast bread for 1 to 2 minutes per side.

4. Line flatbreads with arugula, add burgers, and top with strawberry sauce, then fold bread over burgers.

Makes 6 servings. Per serving: 387 cal, 8 g fat (2 g sat), 54 g carbs, 7 g fiber, 497 mg sodium, 27 g protein

 

Stuffed Portobello Burgers with Caramelized Onions

1 Tbsp butter                                             nutrition tips for women portobella burger
2 Spanish onions, thinly sliced
1 Tbsp brown sugar
1 tsp balsamic vinegar
8 portobello mushrooms
1 Tbsp vegetable oil
1/2 eggplant, sliced into thin rounds
3 oz roasted red peppers
4 oz sliced low-fat mozzarella
1 loaf focaccia bread

1. Melt butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and cook until translucent, about 4 to 5 minutes. Mix in brown sugar and balsamic vinegar. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover pan, and cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally.

2. Meanwhile, preheat grill to medium. Remove stems from mushrooms, brush with oil, and season with salt and pepper to taste.

3. Place eggplant slices on grill, cook for 2 minutes per side, then set them aside. Add mushrooms to grill, stem sides down, and cook for 6 to 7 minutes. Flip mushrooms and cook for another 4 minutes.

4. Top 4 mushrooms with red peppers and mozzarella, then cover each with a remaining mushroom, stem side down. (Stem sides should be facing each other.) Cook for 2 minutes or until cheese has melted; set aside.

5. Meanwhile, slice focaccia bread in half lengthwise down the side, then slice each half into 4 squares. Toast squares on grill, 2 minutes per side.

6. Place each stuffed mushroom on a focaccia square; top with onions, eggplant, and focaccia square.

Makes 4 servings. Per serving: 536 cal, 14 g fat (5 g sat), 81 g carbs, 7 g fiber, 909 mg sodium, 26 g protein

 

Get even more bikini-friendly burger recipes and other great healthy ideas perfect for any BBQ!

 

Add your favorite healthy bbq recipe to this edition of nutrition advice for women. Our Comment Section below is the perfect place to swap and share.  

 

 

* Some content orginally appeared in and article written by Matthew G. Kadey, M.S., R.D for  Women's Health Magazine 

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Topics: women's health, nutrition advice for women, weight loss for women, nutrition, the women's club, nutritional coaching for women

7 Fast Food Meals Under 350 Calories -- Nutrition Advice for Women

Posted by Angie Quehl on Mar 6, 2011 2:59:00 PM

Fast food is cheap, convenient, filling, and to many of us it tastes good. For busy working women and moms who are constantly on-the-go, if you are eating out, a fast food restaurant is often the fastest, most inexpensive option. Unfortunately, the vast majority of the time it is not a healthy choice.  In fact, eating just one fast food meal can pack enough calories, sodium and fat for an entire day or more! Done on a regular basis, a steady diet consisting of fast food can also lead to a host of different health problems, weight gain being one them.

Still the convenient temptation of fast food can often be hard to resist. As an informed customer, though, you can make healthier choices and still enjoy the price and convenience of fast food restaurants. At the Women's Club, we understand that from time to time, fast food dining is going to happen so here is some fabulous and practical nutrition advice for women to help you make better choices when Mickey D's, Wendy's, Burger King and the like are one the menu!nutrition advice for women

 

Check out these 7 Fast Food Meals Under 350 Calories from the author of the smash-hit book series Eat This, Not That!

 

Other suggestions to help fight the battle of the fast food bulge:

  • Make careful menu selections – pay attention to the descriptions on the menu. Dishes labeled deep-fried, pan-fried, basted, batter-dipped, breaded, creamy, crispy, scalloped, Alfredo, au gratin or in cream sauce are usually high in calories, unhealthy fats or sodium. Order items with more vegetables and choose leaner meats.
  • Drink water with your meal. Soda is a huge source of hidden calories. One 32-oz Big Gulp with regular cola packs about 425 calories, so one Big Gulp can quickly gulp up a big portion of your daily calorie intake. Try adding a little lemon to your water or ordering unsweetened iced tea.
  • “Undress” your food. When choosing items, be aware of calorie- and fat-packed salad dressings, spreads, cheese, sour cream, etc. For example, ask for a grilled chicken sandwich without the mayonnaise. You can ask for a packet of ketchup or mustard and add it yourself, controlling how much you put on your sandwich.
  • Special order. Many menu items would be healthy if it weren't for the way they were prepared. Ask for your vegetables and main dishes to be served without the sauces. Ask for olive oil and vinegar for your salads or order the dressing "on the side" and spoon only a small amount on at a time. If your food is fried or cooked in oil or butter, ask to have it broiled or steamed.
  • Eat mindfully. Pay attention to what you eat and savor each bite. Chew your food more thoroughly and avoid eating on the run. Being mindful also means stopping before you are full. It takes time for our bodies to register that we have eaten. Mindful eating relaxes you, so you digest better, and makes you feel more satisfied.

More Guides to Making Healthier Choices at Your Favorite Restaurant

America's Top 10 Healthiest Fast Food Restaurants – a survey of the 100 largest fast-food chains in America, listing the healthiest places to eat, and healthiest meals to choose. (Health Magazine)

Healthy dining finder – This comprehensive website provides nutritional analysis for hundreds of popular restaurants. Alphabetical listings help you find the healthiest choices at your favorite eatery.(Healthy Dining Program)

Stop&Go Fast Food Nutrition Guide – Offers practical advice to help you navigate the nutritional options at 70 popular chains. Includes a free, downloadable 146-page colored coded guide. (Steven Aldana, PhD)

Portions of this post orginally appeared on HelpGuide.org

 

 

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